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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 23
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, national politics, immigration, the presidential campaign of 2004, and 2008, and first lady michele obama and her role in the obama white house. i met rachel at an event this year where i bought a book, the book she wrote, "american tapestry: the story of the black, white, and multiracial ancestors of michelle obama". after hearing her talk, i'd bought six more copies. i bought them for all my family members and to give out as christmas gifts. now after having read her book i can tell you it was a good investment. it helps me better understand my own family and many mysteries surrounding my own family. rachel l. swams's book is a compelling story that stirs deep emotions. it is also a story that would break them here and with that, let's welcome rachel l. swams. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. >> thank you for coming. in the years leading up to the presidential election, the focus seems to be on barack obama's roots and his family and the fact that he wrote his own biography. now in your book "american tapestry," you put the focus on michele obama. tell us about how you got started do
everything. his father is home. you eventually see that he finds a special woman, and that is michele obama. and his self-identity and local power and he wants to go to harvard and come back to really get into that. >> host: in the interview they conducted on november 10, 2011, you quote him as saying that there is no doubt that what i retained of my politics with the sense that the only way i could ever have a sturdy sense of identity of who i was dependent on digging beneath the surface of people. the only way my life made sense is regardless of culture and race and religion, there is some commonality. the essential human truths and passions and hopes and moral precepts that are universal. >> guest: that is part of the speech that made him famous. the united states, not just red states and blue states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. the presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he could deal with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since. as i'm sure we would both be experiencing in the telephone calls. >> host:
learned everything. michele is not in the book because he has to find that woman that is michele. he figures himself out, his self identity and what he wants out of life which is power, political power, he needs to go to harvard and needs to get into that life. >> host: in the interview you conducted on november 10th, 2011, you quote the president as saying there is no doubt that what i >> reporter: in my politics is a sense that the only way i could have a sturdy sense of identity, of who i was dependent on digging beneath the surface differences of people, the only way my life makes sense is if regardless of culture, race or religion or tribe there is some commonality. these are essential human truths and passions and truth and moral precepts. >> guest: in some ways that is a variation of what he said in a speech that made him famous in 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston where he said there are no red states or. states that the united states. that prevented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in t
of michele obama. this is about 45 minutes. >> good evening. welcome. it is a delight to have you here, rachel, and to have all of you here. it's a lovely summer evening, and it is getting hot out there. summer will now descend upon us. we have a special treat in store for you. as you probably have read and heard about recently the book rachel swarm was written "american tapestry." i am looking forward to hear hearing about the process of this book. to begin i think what the audience probably doesn't know is that we have a lot of support, kind of a community of behind-the-scenes players. starting with the genealogist then a fellowship and maybe just to get started let's talk about the book itself and how we arrived at this amazing story. >> you know, i wrote a story in october of 2009 about the first lady's family. that became the genesis of this book. i am a journalist. this is my first book. this is a new experience for me. >> congratulations. >> thank you. [applause] really, when i thought to do this i kind of
? >> michelle. not michelle obama. >> hi, nice to meet you. this is for you? >> yes, my name is logan. >> what do you do? >> underwriter, too. >> and working as an economist right now. >> initiative made to stand up and understand the new unemployment number. [inaudible] >> no, but i wanted to kiss her because it got me so much press. [inaudible] website that there was low-key they asked all the things. so i loved that. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. nice to meet you. i don't like >> -- 55th anniversary. >> fantastic. when is it? >> today. >> happy anniversary to you, too. >> on your screen now as brains and occurred, professor at the university. his most recent, two generations, for families and history of america's influence in the middle east. professor vandermark, who is daniel was? how did he go about doing that? >> with american entrepreneurial spirit. he also had the financial backing. i've been phelps dodge in the 19th century. >> book was reverend bliss is cool and founded the american university? >> 's initial cool deferred from what became his life work. he came determined to conv
laughed. inaugural ball at night. 1953. the kennedys in 61. storage and laura bush, barack and michele obama. unplanned inauguration's are also a big part of inauguration day. not really the inauguration day, but as part of inauguration history. you cannot deny, and many of us remember 49 years ago next year will be the 50th anniversary of the assassination of john f. kennedy followed by lyndon johnson being sworn in a border force one in dallas. he was sworn in by federal district judge sarah hughes, the only woman to ever square and a president. gerald r. ford being sworn in in the white house in 1974 after richard nixon resigned in disgrace. here's a picture of -- and it's my final story for the day. this story actually inspired me more than any other to write this book. this is calvin coolidge's 1923, president after the death of warren harding. at the time of harding's death coolidge was staying with his father in a very, very small cottage in vermont, a place that had no running water, no electricity, no telephone, no and in that, that did not have any of those things. and so a c
barack obama and michelle obama, and rachel, from what i understand, took a larger view looking at the first lady and her larger ancestry and putting together a larger story as a result. >> host: now, bob -- >> guest: now, those -- >> host: go ahead, please. >> guest: no, i was just going to say of the three, my favorite was the marines. it was exhaustive and exhausting. there's every detail, and it ends as obama is going off to harvard or just enters harvard law school. it's a coming of age biography, the early part of the president's life, and it was very well researched. the jodi book on the political marriage, i thought it was a bit forced. i feel unless you're part of a marriage, it's awful hard to understand, and, especially, when she -- cantor tried to make the case that michelle obama was far more political than she would let on and political tension, a lot of sort of counts of fighting in the obama white house, reported widely in the early days. rachel's history was valuable because we forget although the attention is on president obama being the first black president,
barack and michelle obama and rachel swarms took a larger view, looking at the first lady and her lurcher ancestry in putting together a lurcher story is the result. >> host: bob, go ahead, please. >> guest: i was going to jump in. of those three may paper with marinus. in my review i read of this exhaustive and exhausting. he goes into every detail and his and his obama is going off to harvard or is just entered harvard law school. so it's very much a coming-of-age biography, early part of the president's life and was very well researched. the jodi cantor book i thought was a bit force. unless you're part of the marriage, it's awful hard to understand. chanter try to make the case that michelle o'connell is far more political than she was going to add-on and there was infighting in the up on the way kos. rachel cirencester was valuable because although the tension on the first but president because his weight ancestors came from ulcer, there were no slaves and his family. michelle obama had slaves and weight ancestors is a great american complexity in how we reduce rates to black-and-whi
the marriage between barack and michele obama. from what i and stand rachel took a larger view looking at the first lady and her larger ancestry and putting together a larger story as a result. >> go ahead. >> if i can jump in, my favorite was david maraniss. it was exhaustive and exhausting. he goes into every detail and it ends as obama is going to harvard. so it is very much a coming of age biography, early parts of the president's life, very well researched. a book about political marriage, always feel unless you are part of a marriage, there's a lot to understand, tried to make the case that michele obama was more political than she was going to let on and political tension. in fighting in the obama white house which reports widely in the early days, the history was valuable because of the attention is on president obama being the last president because his black ancestors came from elsewhere there were no slaves in his family. michele obama had slaves and white ancestors, great american complexity in how we induce race to black-and-white but it really isn't. >> just to quickly me
, this is 1953 come here are the kennedys and 61, george and laura bush and dhaka and michelle obama. the young plant inaugurations are also a big part of inauguration day. well it's not really the inauguration day but part of inauguration history. you can't you i and many of us even remember 39 years ago next year will be the 50th anniversary of the assassination of john f. kennedy followed by lyndon johnson being sworn in aboard air force one in dallas. he was sworn in by the federal district judge. she is the only woman to ever swear in a president. here is gerald ford being sworn in in the white house in 1974 after richard nixon resigned in disgrace. and here is a picture of cony if this is my final story for the day, this story actually inspired me probably more than any other to write this book. this is calvin coolidge in 1923 who became president after the death of foreign harding. at the time of his death, he was staying with his father in a very small cottage in vermont, a place that had no running water, no electricity, no telephone camano internet, they didn't have any of those thing
. michele bachmann buys her own clothes. [laughter] contemporary tea party members threatened to orchestrate a congressional impassable from the government over a precipice unless democrats compromise on issues such as thinning and universal health health care ane end of tax breaks for certain wealthy persons. in 1792, sam adams was asked supported whiskey rebellion farmers, who in that year had begun shooting at federal agents rather than pay taxes they considered unfair. adams laughed. he said we will vote against the king and exclude subjects from the government and it is just and necessary, he said. but in his opinion, any citizen of a democratic government who took up against his government ought to be hanged. corporate name change from anyone? thank you very much. [applause] >> we will take questions. i think they would like you to walk to the microphone if you don't mind. thank you. >> in your research, there was some controversy during the election of 1960 and that joseph kennedy manipulated chicago politics to get his son elected president. did you come across any facts about that?
, i will always be grateful to kyle strober who runs our long island office and to michelle basek, his assistant whose family's home was flooded badly on staten island. and finally, the leader of our team is a guy named mike lynch who has molded us into a great operation, and he didn't put his name in here characteristically, but he deserves a huge amount of thanks. of course, my colleague, senator gillibrand, lautenberg, menendez and their teams were essential. we worked as sort of a seamless web, and i look forward to working with them, too, on the implementation of this package. i want to thank senator inouye. when he was ill, he continued to meet with senators gillibrand, menendez, lautenberg and myself, and we knew how much he cared, and i know he's looking down as i think senator mikulski said and he's smiling at the good work that we did in a bipartisan way to get this bill passed. of course, i want to thank senator mikulski. she is -- this was the first bill she managed and let it be a metaphor for all of her bills. senator gillibrand and i have just labeled her the engineer. s
drops off and michele bachmann drops off and left with a last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person. finally you get the last person standing. >> host: process of e elimination. >> which is consistent in whatever organization it is. i think it is in a sense is a simplified version of reality. i think you used a theory. theory start with simple and you make them more complex. if you take ge famous for the way it chooses lards. ge we always tell our students it's a company that works at practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things we say it should do. it's incredible profitable. if you have to pick them it's good at picking leaders. it's good at developing managers and picking the right people. ge spends twenty years selecting among the organization and slowly promoting them over and over and over again. and so the end of the day, twenty years, so you to work your way up. at the end of the day you get five finalist the who ceo picks one person from the finalists. you sympathy of the fi
lady michelle obama. >> so, they put the missiles in cuba. the united states discovered that, and then the tension builds and would have a blockade around cuba. one of the things that happened during that time is the soviet submarine is found by american ships and they start to drop missile charged, depth charges on the soviet submarine. they not got the electrical system. the carbon dioxide was rising. people were passing out inside the submarine. they have no communication with the kremlin. the commander of the submarine says load the torpedoes. let's attack. the world warp probably start already up above we're not going to do somersaults data when the war is starting. so they launch a nuclear torpedo. they said it ready to launch. fortunately, one of the of the commanders on the ship who had a lower rate talked him out of it. they might have saved the world. >> this is so close to the age. it really was one of the scariest moments of mankind. we didn't know this. we were teenagers. we were so grateful. that's when all this criticism of kennedy and all this after korda back
the largest prison population in the entire world. you've probably read michelle alexander's book, about the new jim crow. and if people you know, having had that experience like you, i'm sitting in this room and there's like 500 people and -- i've been around this for 17 years. finally, like in seattle people are saying that she figured a 77 year-old man on his doorstep sunday and they want us to forget about it. i think that what you are showing us, when people start coming together and start saying i'm not going to stop, i'm going to work on this, i'm going to try to free somebody. what it's like everybody was doing it but i'd like to see everyone in this room down on the streets in seattle saying we are not going to take this any longer but it does mean something. i've been frustrated that i have to say because anybody in this room should be out in the streets screaming bloody murder about this but everything it does make a difference, besides this one case at a time but i don't know what you think about that. am i making sense? everyone -- we're having a protest next month. >> let m
was served at dinner, what michelle obama were, who was there and what was senator so-and-so really like? what obama said to you when he shook her hand and what about that spoon that fell onto your jacket? today we pick up the cell and call someone and we have lost the more we tax someone and we don't describe the ambience, the music. we will say a obama obama cool or senator so-and-so. 200 years ago bibas it down and composed several lengthy letters that provided the nuance, the context. we know what the weather was uncertain days during george's life because he took notice of the weather. we know how many hoc said head of cattle he slaughtered on a particular day. he bortell down. today we are losing all that and the internet provides a great way for all of us to do our research. the internet provides a way of connecting people but also with all the new technology we could be losing a lot so historians and another 100 years are going to have a rough time. today we seem to be extra cognizant of the impact of the damning letter. i think historically to some extent also, one thing george
likelihood of raising children alone. michele obama was a health care executive making a lot of money and barack obama was in law school doing public service and they have switched places where he is the main guy and she is the supporter and this is a pretty common pattern of marriage among the college-educated and it has proved to be a stable, good model where as for everybody else in america for the 70% of americans who don't have a college degree marriage is disappearing. people are not getting married. if they are getting married they have high divorce rate and rates of single motherhood are astronomical. it is largely because women are doing everything and the men are dropping out of society. they are not finding themselves -- i reported this in this town in alabama, a hard time getting on their feet figuring out how to remake themselves and what you see is a lot of men going on disability or just not dropping out of the work force. we have the lowest labor force participation rate among men they have had since the 1940s. i want to close off by explaining what the -- what "the en
served there under the leadership of speaker o'neill, majority leader michel and then jim wright and michel, a republican, there was no way they would consider doing a vote with the majority the majority. they wanted to get 218 votes. that's what they did on reforming social security. that's what they did on virtually everything. get democrats and republicans together and get 218 votes. that's the challenge i gave to the speaker today, speaker boehner. let the house vote. if they voted overwhelmingly, mr. president, one republican suggested, one republican house member that more than half of the republicans in the house would vote for giving the tax security to people who make less than $250,000 a year. so i say let's have speaker boehner call upon the republicans in the house to add 25 or so votes to what the democrats would do, and you'd have 218 votes and we could go on to taking care of the fiscal cliff. mr. president, my friend protests too much. the senate is broken and needs to be fixed and we need to change the rules. we change them all the time. last year we changed the
interesting. thank you so much. [applause] >> i did just write this name to the michelle held up committed to better achieve, brought up of hope and change. i did it because i was talking to the national review online come and interview and said why did she write this? is admit to to be an awakening, something like that? i said you bet it is. it stuns me that half of the american population completely fell for this empty mantra of hope and change. the obama administration was going to be that transcendent administration that got us all together. that is why barack obama earned the white house because he was going to be the great uniter. remember that inaugural address where he said to conservatives, i want to listen to you, especially when we disagree. he was going to meet with conservatives in congress want to wreak. he met twice. so three days after that beautiful speech, the conservatives in congress came to the white house and had a meeting and eric cantor, congressman from virginia articulated the conservative perspective on increasing taxes, that we shouldn't do that. you know what o
at the gene yolings of michelle obama. and journalists and historian on the biography of barack obama. that's followed by edward kline who wrote the "amateur" about the president's life and career before reaching the white house. and later, the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> so this is always puts the missiles in cuba. the united states discovers that with our flight, our surveillance flights over there. then the tension builds and we have quarantine of blockade around cuba. one of the things that happens during the time the soviet submarine is found by american ships, and they start to drop missile charge, death charges on the soviet submarine. they knocked out the electrical system. carbon dioxide rising. people passes outside in the submarine. they have no communication. the commander of the submarine says load the or it torpedoes. let's attack. the war probably started already. we're not going to do summer salts down here. we're not going disgrace our country. they launch a nuclear torpedo. they set it to launch. fortunately one of the other
of president obama in the first lady. and they look at the genealogy of michele obama. then david maraniss in his book on barack obama. later, the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> you don't always find many in any area embracing investigative reporting. it's not just economics. if the discomfort that it often causes. because it is troublesome. it is more than economics if you are going to ruffle the feathers of someone powerful. that gives those people running into complaints of the publisher. we were very fortunate through the 70s and almost all of our prayers. let the chips fall where they may. >> donald bartlett and james steele will take your calls and e-mails and tweets next month on internet. they began their collaborative work in the 70s and are the co-authors of seven books. watch live at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> someone put these missiles in cuba. the united states discovers that. then the tension builds. one of the things that happens during that time that a soviet submarine is found by american ships they knocked out the e
lady michelle obama. then journalist and historian david maraniss on his biography of barack obama. that's followed by more on president obama with edward klein who wrote "the amateur" about the president's life and career before reaching the white house. and later the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors of any era embracing investigative reporting. the point we've seen over the years it's not just economics, it's the discomfort that investigative reporting often causes in a newsroom. because it's troublesome. it's that more than the economics. i mean, if you're going to ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, that gets those people running in to complain to the publisher, and there are stories that are legion over years about those kinds of things happening. don and i were fortunate through really almost all our career or to work for people who were really strong and upright in that area and just let the chips fall where they may. >> the investigative team of donald bar let and james steele wil
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)